Reprinted from The Waupaca Post

Written by Cal Swenson

DOWNTOWN WAUPACA 1925

The night was electrifying – it was a Saturday night on Main Street in Waupaca.

The atmosphere was alive, a cacophony of music, honking, whistling and clanging; music, because in those days 20's band concerts were on Saturday night and all the stores were open; honking from the many cars approaching the intersection of Main and Fulton streets; whistling – that's right – Chief of Police Bill Ware, sparkling in uniform, directing traffic – one blast, then two, waving a white glove and baton; clanging, resounding from the open summer street car number 19 as Motorman Luke Dunn proudly coasted to a stop discharging passengers from the Grand View Hotel and Veteran's Home.

Oooooh, look! What is this lovely sight? Why, of course, it's that beautiful carefree Greek Goddess Athena Johnson Mudd, that rich girl from the Lakes. She waved to us from behind the wheel of her sleek black Lincoln Phaeton with the glass windshield between the front and back seats as she approached the stop sign.

The band was playing but there was another attraction – truly a magnet. It was called "Radio". Holly's Furniture Store and Undertaking Parlor were located on the site of the present day Lighthouse Bookstore.

Holly's were among the pioneers of early radio. A motley crowd could be seen gathering in the rear amidst a display of odd-looking morning glory horns and various boxes and cases with implanted bulbs or "tubes" and very likely some caskets. Far away a voice was calling "WGY, Schenectady", "KDKA, Pittsburgh" or " WGN, Chicago".

From there we'll cross over to the Drivas's Kandy Kitchen for a hot fudge sundae or a 5 cent bag of popcorn.

Well, you can take it from there.

That was Waupaca one Saturday night.

Reprinted from The Waupaca Post

Written by Cal Swenson